Why I’m Going Back to Therapy

Why I'm Going Back to Therapy (1)

I’ve been striving to be more vulnerable lately. My most recent act of true vulnerability was admitting to a stranger that my wedding was cancelled at a queer bar in Paris a week after it happened. It was painful to say it out loud, but doing so helped me accept it just a little bit more. And the stranger was really sweet about it. She simply told me I’d be okay. Hearing that from someone who wasn’t my parents made me believe it.

So I’m going to be vulnerable again now: I’m going back to therapy. My first session is tomorrow morning.

Why am I so terrified to admit that? Maybe it’s about wanting to appear strong in the face of defeat. Going back to therapy means I’m not strong enough to handle it on my own, right?

It could also be about not wanting to scare my family and friends. Going back to therapy implies that something is majorly wrong, that my last time with a therapist was a failure, and they’ll now have a reason to worry about me. I’ll be looked at differently.

Clearly the stigma that comes with mental health issues is alive and well. The unfortunate part is that these messed up ideas make their way into my brain and cause me to think negatively about my own mental health issues sometimes. Once I take a minute to tune out society’s omni-present judgement, I try to remind myself that there is nothing wrong with going back to therapy.

I repeat: there is nothing wrong with going to therapy! This is especially important to say in a time when our collective mental health (as a country, as a world) is suffering.

The truth of that matter is that going back to therapy is showing strength: I’m standing up for myself and getting the help I deserve. That takes courage. And sure, I probably wouldn’t be going back to therapy if everything in my life was fantastic right now, but there are plenty of reasons to see a therapist that don’t involve a big crisis. If anyone in my circle really views me differently for getting help, then they don’t belong in my circle anyway. And my last dabble into therapy was anything but a failure.

I first tried therapy at my college in 2011, but really committed to it in 2015 when I was at my lowest low after graduating. My anxiety was practically my best friend and depression was making it hard to get out of bed. My first therapist helped think about my thought processes for the first time and my life slowly but surely changed. I still use many of the techniques that I learned from that year of have therapy on a weekly basis.

So why am I going back now, three years later? I would like to talk through the details of my recent trauma with an unbiased person and try to understand what happened a little better. I want to understand how these events have fundamentally changed me. I also want to talk about how to move forward from all of this and think about what I want my new future (bright and shiny) to look like. I have a lot of concerns that are weighing on me: how (and who) do I go about dating again? What career moves do I want to make in the near future that will impact my long term future? A big goal is to learn from my past mistakes and not make the same ones again.

I’m not in crisis mode nor am I at my lowest low. In fact, my life isn’t as terrible as I thought it would be when the breakup first happened. Solo travel has brought me major happiness in bursts. Being a dog mom is pretty therapeutic and my pup has completely won my heart. I’m spending a lot of time in Westchester enjoying the trees and the company of my ridiculous parents, which has been a nice change from Manhattan. I get to see my friends now and then, and a select few of them are really amazing at checking in on me throughout all this. And hey, at least Miz Cracker made it to the top five on Drag Race!

My life is pretty good. All of the concerns that are nagging my soul are legitimate too. And I’m going back to therapy.

Sometimes your own advice is the advice you need to hear. I wrote an article a few weeks ago on finding your first therapist. Early this week, I signed up for PrideCounseling.com, a segment of Better Help’s online counseling services. I opted to try an online option to save money. I was quickly matched with a therapist who I’ve been messaging throughout the week. She’s already been understanding and has asked me some fascinating questions to ponder on. Our first video session is tomorrow morning. I’ll be sure to write about the experience of online counseling in the future.

Truth be told, I am a little bit nervous for my first session. I keep telling myself that it will be well worth it though. I deserve help, and so does anyone who is struggling with their mental state and lives. I’m not going to be secretive about it because that only adds to the stigma. Everyone should be able to access mental health care without feeling ashamed or embarrassed.

Note: I am very aware that therapy and mental health treatment is a privilege. This country makes it particularly difficult to access help if you’re not rich. If you want to try therapy but know your finances can’t support it, consider trying an online option. BetterHelp and PrideCounseling gave me a financial aid discount after I provided them with my financial details.

Why I'm Going Back to Therapy

7 thoughts on “Why I’m Going Back to Therapy

  1. Pingback: 5 Tips for Adults Living with their Parents — Self-Care Season

  2. Pingback: How Vulnerability Helps Me Cope with Anxiety — Self-Care Season

  3. Anissa

    I loved therapy and I’m going back too. It really helped having an objective ear listening to me without judgement. I would encourage people to go even if they think they feel well. It benefits the best of us.

  4. Eki Ayemenre

    I am so impressed with the way you’ve taken life. Few people in your situation can come to terms with this condition, talk less of opening expressing it.. Thanks for encouragement to others.

  5. simplyshannonagins

    I’m so glad you found value in therapy and recognize that it can be used as a tool even when life isn’t that bad! I personally think everyone, even someone with the perfect, happiest life, can benefit from therapy! Thank you so much for being so open and sharing your experiences!

  6. Rosemarie

    Good for you going back. Almost everyone benefits from therapy in some season of life. I was not able to be attracted to healthy dating partners until I did 3 years and it was tough but so worth it to be emotionally healthy. I also agree with you finding the right therapist is so critical. Thanks.

  7. Jennie Berkson

    I so appreciate you writing and sharing from your heart. I completely believe that seeking help is courageous and takes a strong, in touch with themselves, person to do so. How wonderful that you want to better yourself, your life and ultimately those around you! I applaud you! … Jennie Berkson

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